Keyword: Min Jun Ho Jewel In The Palace

Century-old stone palace reborn as historical museum

Century-old stone palace reborn as historical museum

One hundred and seventeen years ago, King Gojong (r. 1863-1907) of Joseon rechristened the nation as the Daehan Empire in 1897 and ruled as an emperor until the end of his reign. The king, then emperor, built a Western-style stone palace, the Seokjojeon, inside the Deoksugung Palace grounds, from which he ruled the empire.

The building was designed in 1898 by John Reginald Harding (1858-1921), a British architect. Construction began in 1900 and continued for 10 years. The building was originally built for residential purposes and had a reception room, bedrooms, living rooms and bathrooms. However, it was mostly used as a banquet hall. It was also used as a residence for the last crown prince of Korea, King Yeongchin (1897-1970), the seventh son of Gojong. ...

Palace festival opens this September

Palace festival opens this September

A festival will be held in Seoul this September offering the opportunity to experience and enjoy various aspects of ancient royal court life during Joseon times (1392-1910). Festival-goers can learn about royal ancestral rites, the tea ceremony and court food, appreciate Korean traditional music, or gugak, performances at the palace, or simply walk through the secret garden of the king.

The Cultural Heritage Administration and the Korea Cultural Heritage Foundation will jointly host their Royal Culture Festival 2014 from September 20 to 28 at four selected palaces across Seoul, as well as at the Jongmyo Shrine, at Gwanghwamun Square and along the Seoul fortress wall. ...

A palace procession

A palace procession

About 40 performers of the National Gugak Center play traditional Korean instruments in front of the National Palace Museum of Korea on Thursday. The music was played during the Joseon Dynasty (1392-1910) when there was a royal ritual. [NEWS1]

Palace exhibit presents a picture of royal health

Palace exhibit presents a picture of royal health

Who wouldn”t want to live a long and healthy life? The kings of the Joseon Dynasty (1392-1910) certainly did, and so they sought primary access to what”s known to be good for the human body, including top-notch medical services.

In the National Palace Museum of Korea”s newest exhibition, “The Birth, Aging, Illness and Death of the Royal Family of the Joseon Dynasty: Guarding against Diseases”, details of the evolution of medical sciences in the Joseon era are shown....